Mistakes to Avoid When Selling a House

 

Small house for sale on white background. 3d rendered image

Last week, we discussed the mistakes you should sidestep when buying a house. This week, we’ll transition to the other end of the spectrum and talk about the mistakes to dodge when selling a house. With this task being as significant as buying a house, you have to make sure to be every bit as diligent when you place your house on the market.

Curb appeal is essential. As soon as a potential buyer drives up to your property, you want them to feel excited about going into your house. But, if you don’t spruce up the exterior, it may turn away the buyer immediately, and you don’t want a buyer skipping your house before they even place a foot in the door. By neglecting to improve your curb appeal, it may send the buyers a message that you don’t upkeep your property on a regular basis, not just on the outside, but also on the inside. You’ve heard that first impressions are everything when it comes to meeting new people, and this notion applies just as strongly when it comes to properly maintaining your house for a buyer.

Never withhold any information from the buyer, such as your house having issues with pest infestations or leaking pipes. You should always make sure your agent is aware of any and all issues so they can disclose that information to the buyer. Place yourself in the shoes of the buyer and think to yourself that you wouldn’t want a seller keeping any important information to themselves if you were trying to purchase a house. If you choose to keep some details to yourself about the house’s faults, you’re setting yourself up for a very rocky negotiation, and even some possible legal troubles. The final buyer is putting a considerable amount of money into your house, and it will be very unfair to them if they are not given all of the necessary information before making an informed decision on your house.

If you have a pet or child, you know they’re prone to creating a mess every so often. However, you want to make sure your house is clean before an open house or a private showing. It’s important the buyers are able to envision themselves living in the house, but if there is a mess that gives the hint of pets or children, it will take the buyers out of their visualization. When you take your children out of the house during an open house or private showing, either take your pet with you, or place it somewhere in the house where it won’t be in the way of the agent and buyer. With these buyers taking the time to visit your house, it’s your responsibility to clean the house so they can see the house appearing at its best.

Speaking of buyers envisioning themselves in your house, this will be easier for them if you de-clutter your house. When you forego getting rid of your house’s clutter, the buyer won’t get a clear idea of the exact space a certain part of your room may have, such as a buyer taking a look at your closet, but not knowing exactly how the space looks because of your clothing taking up too much room. Although you’re still living in the house when it’s being shown, the buyers don’t want to be constantly reminded of that fact as they are looking around at someone else’s house, so remove any clutter that may prevent a buyer’s ability to imagine themselves in the home. De-cluttering will also allow a buyer to move around more freely without the worry of disturbing anything.

As far as pricing is concerned, this is probably the biggest pitfall of the home-selling process. You must realize you and your buyer are going to view the house’s price differently. Seeing as you don’t want to set a price too high in the beginning and turn away buyers, use your agent to help figure out a realistic market price that will attract buyers.

When you’re selling a house, you want to make sure everything goes right because you’re parting with something that has been an important part of your life. I know these mistakes may be worrisome, but if you take your time during the selling process and seek help where you need it, you’ll be fine. Just collaborate with your agent, establish the best course of action, and sell, sell, sell!

To learn more about Better Homes and Gardens Rand Realty, visit their website and Facebook page, and make sure to “Like” their page. You can also follow them on Twitter.

 

Sources

www.realtor.com

www.forbes.com

www.chearsheet.com

www.homebuying.about.com

www.time.com

www.trepryor.realtytimes.com

Posted on November 18, 2015 at 10:34 am
Rand Realty | Category: Rand Country Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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